Money versus happiness

…that of all things worth having in life, such as kindness, wisdom, and the human affections, none are on offer in the world’s shopping-malls.

– A.C. Grayling, The Meaning of Things

I followed a course on how to be idle, run by the Idler Academy. I came across this academy a couple of years back when I was doing a bit of research on being idle for the blog. Becoming idle (rather than ‘being idle’, as I feel that I am yet to achieve such a state) is very much a goal of mine. How do I free up my time and rely on less materially, to cultivate my mind and one day, make a living from something I really enjoy doing? That is a lot to ask, but one has to at least make a start.

One of the sessions of the course is about being thrifty, this is very much a key to becoming idle. Being thrifty is necessary since idleness inevitably involves earning less. The Idler Academy advises us to learn to love accounting. A simple way to start is to note down how much one spends every day. I have been doing this for over a year and it’s amazing to realise how much I can spend on not that much really. I remember I spent over €20 on a very disappointing fish and chips. When I noted it down in my little accounting book, I swore that I would never spend as much money again on shite. If I’m going to fork out €20 for lunch, it better be good.

I have also miraculously managed to work part-time. I say miraculously because my day job is in a very big organisation with a lot of rules, procedures and hierarchy. I honestly didn’t think it would be possible, but with preparation, opportunity and negotiation, I managed to get some time off per week. I plan to use this time to write more and explore other opportunities, and sometimes, just be idle.

With the reduced working week comes the reduced salary. The difference is quite remarkable and I have to tighten my belt. But again, my little accounting book comes in handy: I’ve learnt to budget and stay on top of my spending. Plus, it’s fun to be a bit more resourceful and less wasteful.

When I returned to work on Monday (after the first week of part-time), my boss asked me how were my few days of freedom. “Really nice,” I said. They were. For a couple of days a week, I am free. I remember on my first day off I was dancing around listening to Justin Timberlake. I was elated.

Sometimes I miss the extra cash, but then again, what’s the point of having it if I don’t actually have the time to spend it? I could save it, of course but I’m saving it for future expense. If my goal is to try to make a living out of my passion, then my free time is worth more now than the additional money in the future.

For Together magazine, I wrote about the money versus happiness dilemma. The inspiration for the article came from staying with a widower in Indonesia. She didn’t have a lot materially, but she was happy. And I think what made her happy was the daily connections and interactions with her neighbours and her family. Enjoy the read.

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2 thoughts on “Money versus happiness

  1. Dear gemma,
    Again a great article!!!! It’s so true, time is priceless, and yet so precious. People often say ‘time is money’. It’s soooo much more right? Time to explore, to discover, to feel the flow of life, to connect to others, to be with ourselves and with our thoughts. I often think that we need to learn to give ourselves more time, and even ‘waste’ time. We should allow ourselves to be ‘nomades’ in our own lives, and not always follow a precise defined path, in order to experiment and discover more the world around us. I would say ‘THE TIME WE ENJOY WASTING IS NOT WASTED TIME! 😉
    Also, I would definately recommend you the documentary: https://www.theminimalists.com/films/
    It makes us think about all those objects we surround ourselves with and makes us wonder: do we really need all of this stuff? Even more…don’t they sometime pollute our mind? Well, thanks again Gem for your thoughts and can’t wait to read a next article!
    Nathalie xx

  2. Dear gemma,
    Again a great article!!!! It’s so true, time is priceless, and yet so precious. People often say ‘time is money’. It’s soooo much more right? Time to explore, to discover, to feel the flow of life, to connect to others, to be with ourselves and with our thoughts. I often think that we need to learn to give ourselves more time, and even ‘waste’ time. We should allow ourselves to be ‘nomades’ in our own lives, and not always follow a precise defined path, in order to experiment and discover more the world around us. I would say ‘THE TIME WE ENJOY WASTING IS NOT WASTED TIME! 😉
    Also, I would definately recommend you the documentary: https://www.theminimalists.com/films/
    It makes us think about all those objects we surround ourselves with and makes us wonder: do we really need all of this stuff? Even more…don’t they sometime pollute our mind? Well, thanks again Gem for your thoughts and can’t wait to read a next article!
    Nathalie xx

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